Work That !

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Work That !

Teriyaki Boyz Feat. Pharrel & Chris Brown

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Another funky tune by the Teriyaki Boyz, collaborating with Pharrel once again after Zock On.
Their new album “SERIOUS JAPANESE” will be out on 28th January !

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(HOOK)
Let me see ya work that Let me see ya work that
Let me see ya work that Let me see ya work that
Work That! Work That! Work That!
Work That! Work That! Work That!
Work That! Work That! Work That!
Work That! Work That! Work That!

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(VERBAL)
GIRL in a PURPLE, said she THIRSTY PASS that GRAPPA,
swig that girlfriend…
So heated this WEEKEND Best-looking EARTHLING yet to surface
“She’s taken… what’s the purpose?”
“Just looking… CAN I DO THAT?”
Wanna DO that, chauffeur that THING back home,
just watch her WORK that…
Her shirt be BURSTIN When she twist & twirk that skirt get
Lifeted HIGH, so SCI-FI said she SHY? YEAH RIGHT!
もう相当 末期症状 ポッケにROCKET、どうしよう?どうしよう!
東京妄想 BOYZが爆走 高度上昇 We in MOTION

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(RYO-Z)
He say She say TB リクエスト まんまのシーケンスで深いGroove
P先輩 say line for the bathroom どんなサイズも一目で採寸
TOPからアンダー ウェスト ヒップ
HOTなナンバーがかかればZOCK ON!
みんなでWillie Bounce あの娘とDirty Wine
とっくのとうに忘れてるぜ恥じらい
まるで真夜中のまじない フロア中揺らすBasslineに感じない?
どこまでも照らすSearchlight 逃げられやしない しなるBodyline
Let me see ya work that 呑み過ぎKnockdown
どころか頭はますますClock up
なんとか立ってられるくらいフラフラ
もう一回ドアタマ戻してPull up

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(WISE)
Uh〜 She got crazy charisma, body like a magnet 引き起こす asthma
引き寄せる手綱 アッて間に乗りこなすじゃじゃ馬
Oooh I’ve seen that on video,
tame her like a mustang ride like in a rodeo
Oh That’s what I mean move it slow,
work that thing like you wanna be a pro
Uh, Straight from TOKIO 眠らない街へようこそ
Neon lights shinin’bright 彼女が履くJeans みたくTight
街はGlamorous 夜はScandalous Can you really hang with us?
味は格別 テリヤキ マジです Yo, Can you handle this?

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(ILMARI)
TokyoのネオンみたいにShining フロアで悩殺されちゃヤバい
タイトなサイジング(oh-)そのバディー
フレッシュでライカ酸味の効くパイン
オーラ迸る凸凹ライン 僕の手を握る
なんならどっか いっちゃいそうさ
アゲアゲオズマみたいにパーティー 今夜も超HOT(超HOT)
Turn It Upで超ハイ HOW HIGHどんぐらい?
腰揺らす超満員 頂上までgroovin
Turn It Upで超ハイ HOW HIGHどんぐらい?
腰揺らす超満員 頂上までgroovin

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(PHARRELL)
Girl, work that body Girl, work that body
Girl, work that body Girl, move your body
Work That! Work That! Work That!
Work That! Work That! Work That!
Work That! Work That! Work That!
Work That! Work That! Work That!

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(Chorus)
Let me see ya work that Let me see ya work that
Let me see ya work that Let me see ya work that
You can work it out but you gotta get started now
You can work it out but you gotta get started now

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Mr President, Barack Hussein Obama

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The Obama speech

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Obama Inauguration

44th President of the United States making his Presidency oath

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My fellow citizens:

I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.

Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forbearers, and true to our founding documents.

So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.

That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.

These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land – a nagging fear that America’s decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.

Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America – they will be met.

On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.

On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.

We remain a young nation, but in the words of scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea, passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted – for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things – some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labour, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.

For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and travelled across oceans in search of a new life.

For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and ploughed the hard earth.

For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sahn.

Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.

This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions – that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.

For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of the economy calls for action, bold and swift, and we will act – not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We will restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology’s wonders to raise health care’s quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. All this we will do.

Now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions – who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. Their memories are short. For they have forgotten what this country has already done; what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose, and necessity to courage.

What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them – that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works – whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. And those of us who manage the public’s dollars will be held to account – to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day – because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.

Nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. Its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control – that a nation cannot prosper long when it favours only the prosperous. The success of our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gross domestic product, but on the reach of our prosperity; on the ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart – not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to our common good.

As for our common defence, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our founding fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience’s sake. And so to all other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born: know that America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman, and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, and we are ready to lead once more.

Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with the sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead, they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint.

We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles once more, we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort – even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former foes, we will work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the spectre of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defence, and for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken; you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.

For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus – and non-believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society’s ills on the West – know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to suffering outside our borders; nor can we consume the world’s resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.

As we consider the road that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who, at this very hour, patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages. We honour them not only because they are guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service; a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet, at this moment – a moment that will define a generation – it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.

For as much as government can do and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter’s courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent’s willingness to nurture a child, that finally decides our fate.

Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends – honesty and hard work, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism – these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility – a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation, and the world, duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.

This is the price and the promise of citizenship.

This is the source of our confidence – the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny.

This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed – why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall, and why a man whose father less than 60 years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.

So let us mark this day with remembrance, of who we are and how far we have travelled. In the year of America’s birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At a moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words be read to the people:

“Let it be told to the future world…that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive…that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet [it].”

America. In the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children’s children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God’s grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.

Thank you. God bless you. And God bless the United States of America.

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Invading for the cause of good

Is it Time to Invade Burma ?

From Time

The disaster in Burma presents the world with perhaps its most serious humanitarian crisis since the 2004 Asian tsunami. By most reliable estimates, close to 100,000 people are dead. Delays in delivering relief to the victims, the inaccessibility of the stricken areas and the poor state of Burma’s infrastructure and health systems mean that number is sure to rise. With as many as 1 million people still at risk, it is conceivable that the death toll will, within days, approach that of the entire number of civilians killed in the genocide in Darfur.

So what is the world doing about it? Not much. The military regime that runs Burma initially signaled it would accept outside relief, but has imposed so many conditions on those who would actually deliver it that barely a trickle has made it through. Aid workers have been held at airports. UN food shipments have been seized. US naval ships packed with food and medicine idle in the Gulf of Thailand, waiting for an all-clear that may never come.

Burma’s rulers have relented slightly, agreeing Friday to let in supplies and perhaps even some foreign relief workers. The government says it will allow a US C-130 transport plane to land inside Burma Monday. But it’s hard to imagine a regime this insular and paranoid accepting robust aid from the US military, let alone agreeing to the presence of US Marines on Burmese soil — as Thailand and Indonesia did after the tsunami. The trouble is that the Burmese haven’t shown the ability or willingness to deploy the kind of assets needed to deal with a calamity of this scale — and the longer Burma resists offers of help, the more likely it is that the disaster will devolve beyond anyone’s control. “We’re in 2008, not 1908,” says Jan Egeland, the former U.N. emergency relief coordinator. “A lot is at stake here. If we let them get away with murder we may set a very dangerous precedent.”

That’s why it’s time to consider a more serious option: invading Burma. Some observers, including former USAID director Andrew Natsios, have called on the US to unilaterally begin air drops to the Burmese people regardless of what the junta says. The Bush Administration has so far rejected the idea — “I can’t imagine us going in without the permission of the Myanmar government,” Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Thursday — but it’s not without precedent: as Natsios pointed out to the Wall Street Journal, the US has facilitated the delivery of humanitarian aid without the host government’s consent in places like Bosnia and Sudan.

A coercive humanitarian intervention would be complicated and costly. During the 2004 tsunami, some 24 US ships and 16,000 troops were deployed in countries across the region; the mission cost the U.S. $5 million a day. Ultimately, the US pledged nearly $900 million to tsunami relief. (By contrast, it has offered just $3.25 million to Burma.) But the risks would be greater this time: the Burmese government’s xenophobia and insecurity make them prone to view US troops — or worse, foreign relief workers — as hostile forces. (Remember Black Hawk Down?) Even if the U.S. and its allies made clear that their actions were strictly for humanitarian purposes, it’s unlikely the junta would believe them. “You have to think it through — do you want to secure an area of the country by military force? What kinds of potential security risks would that create?” says Egelend. “I can’t imagine any humanitarian organization wanting to shoot their way in with food.”

So what other options exist? Retired General William Nash of the Council on Foreign Relations says the US should first pressure China to use its influence over the junta to get them to open up and then supply support to the Thai and Indonesian militaries to carry out relief missions. “We can pay for it — we can provide repair parts to the Indonesians so they can get their Air Force up. We can lend the them two C-130s and let them paint the Indonesian flag on them,” Nash says. “We have to get the stuff to people who can deliver it and who the Burmese government will accept, even if takes an extra day or two and even if it’s not as efficient as the good old US military.” Egeland advocates that the UN Security Council take punitive steps short of war, such as freezing the regime’s assets and issuing warrants for the arrest of individual junta members if they were to leave the country. Similar measures succeeded in getting the government of Ivory Coast to let in foreign relief teams in 2002, Egelend says.

And if that fails? “It’s important for the rulers to know the world has other options,” Egeland says. “If there were, say, the threat of a cholera epidemic that could claim hundreds of thousands of lives and the government was incapable of preventing it, then maybe yes — you would intervene unilaterally.” But by then, it could be too late. The cold truth is that states rarely undertake military action unless their national interests are at stake; and the world has yet to reach a consensus about when, and under what circumstances, coercive interventions in the name of averting humanitarian disasters are permissible. As the response to the 2004 tsunami proved, the world’s capacity for mercy is limitless. But we still haven’t figured out when to give war a chance.

***

The death toll due to the hideous cyclone that hit the Burmese land lately is rising as we speak. The number shows no sign of stop due to the delay of aid in the country mainly because of the cruel military dictatorship which is controlling the country, and those who are having the unrighteous power over the country right now are sending unbelievable messages to the world that they will only accept aid reliefs under certain conditions which simply can be taken as “silent death sentences” for people who really need instant aid which are not reaching them at all. According to this article, not much actions are taken and even if they were taken, they are all delayed due to the intolerable manners of the juntas.

Will America fly in and do some “dictatorship cleaning” in order to ease the situation ? Well, but I think the country would not need a war right now which will only worsen things up and which will also only lead to a bigger number of deaths. What would be the most optimum solution for this catastrophe ? Leaders of the world and experts of political science, this is the only thing I have to say : be fast !

How well do you know Uniqlo ?

Have you heard of Uniqlo ?

Asano modeling with Chloe Sevigny for Uniqlo

UNIQLO CELEBRATES THE ARRIVAL OF SPRING WITH A NEW UT COLLECTION AND ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN FEATURING CHLOE SEVIGNY

March 5, 2008 (New York, NY)– This spring, UNIQLO’s creative wheels are turning once again with the return of the UT Project (UT stands for UNIQLO t-shirt), a limited edition collection of t-shirts designed by renowned artists, designers, photographers, etc. Arriving in stores on March 17th, with deliveries throughout the season, this collection features t-shirts from famed artists Keith Harring and Basquiat, among other designers and artists. Reasonably priced from around $15.50 and offering styles for men, women and children, there is sure to be a style for everyone. These t-shirts will be available in UNIQLO stores worldwide.

To complement this truly innovative idea, UNIQLO is rolling out an advertising campaign featuring Chloe Sevigny and Tadanobu Asano, a Japanese actor, shot by photographer Dan Jackson. This campaign will be featured in wildpostings, a type of viral guerilla-style image campaign, as well as full pages in Time Out New York, AM New York and the New York Post, commencing on April 10th.

“”UT is about self expression, so we took this as our starting point for the campaign. With Tadanobu Asano and Chloe Sevigny, we had them express various characters and emotions that they found in the t-shirt designs. We wanted them to bring the designs to life,” said Markus Kiersztan, owner of MP Creative and consulting creative director for UNIQLO.

The UT Project will continue to be an important initiative for UNIQLO in the future as illustrated by the launch of the interactive UT Grand Prix Program, which enables artists from all over the world to submit a t-shirt design to possibly be sold as a t-shirt at UNIQLO. The UT Grand Prix is certain to make design more fun and adds another interesting layer to the UT Project. This project commences on April 16th and will be carried out over the months following.

About UNIQLO

Clothing says a lot, but you can say it better. UNIQLO designs, manufactures, markets and sells casual wear that can be worn by anyone, any day. Rather than dictate a look, UNIQLO provides people everywhere with the piece they need to create their own style. And style comes from within, which is why the UNIQLO logo is nearly invisible, tucked away inside the garment.

This concept, along with an unwavering focus on quality and value, has guided UNIQLO’s actions since the establishment of its first store in 1984 Hiroshima, Japan. Today UNIQLO has grown to over 760 UNIQLO stores worldwide and is household name in Japan.

From t-shirts and sweaters to denim, outerwear and trend items, all of our clothes are made according to exacting Japanese standards for quality and come in an astonishing variety of colors and styles. UNIQLO is committed to providing customers with true excellence and innovation in casual wear, from the design and functionality to the fit and color choices. As a company, UNIQLO controls every stage of the creation of its products—from the fabric used to the stringent production control program at the factory and finally to the display at the store. We use the world’s best resources to give customers something better every time.

UNIQLO is a brand of FAST RETAILING and among the top 10 specialty apparel retailers in the world. Other group companies include Theory in the U.S., COMPTOIR DES COTONNIERS and Princesse tam.tam in France, and g.u., CABIN, ONE ZONE, FOOT PARK, VIEW COMPANY and ASPESI in Japan. For more information, visit www.uniqlo.com or www.fastretailing.com.

***

For those of us who came to Japan about 8 years ago, when you hear this brand, it was like cheap and good quality products for foreign students like us. We could get clothings, ranging from spring to winter, at very reasonable prices and it has long to be known in Japan as “cheap stuffs brand”. Well, Uniqlo, now, not that cheap anymore, after they have rebuilt their brand power overseas, trying to gain a status in the international market by empowering themselves through new designs and collaborative ideas with designers, artists and even photographers. I’ve heard from my friend who used to stay in London saying that it is rather a popular Japanese brand and it is not that cheap there. I love the designs of the UT Project this time (1500 yen per T-shirt) and planning to get myself a few once money gets in. The shore at Harajuku is pretty cool so if you haven’t check it out, please do. The YouTube video below will give you a rough preview on how it really looks like. Enjoy.

Madonna Feat. Justin Timberlake & Timbaland : 4 Minutes

4 Minutes

Saw this music clip on TV and I simply love the funky tune the moment I heard it. Madonna collaborating with Justin Timberlake, well, I can say I like it better than the time with Britney. Awesome music and Timbaland really knows how to make it into a funky song as how he always spice up songs with his magic. Some cool dance steps by both Madonna and Justin. The whole video itself was unique as well so, enjoy the song as much as I had ! Peace.

Li San, my talented friend (Part 2)

Michael Johns

My friend, Li San, is definitely talented. I’ve introduced her in my previous post, so check it out. Look at this completed sketch of Michael Johns from that American Idol TV show and yes, she’s a freaky fan of that show especially when she refers David Cook and Michael Johns as her men. *hehe* I personally am amazed on how she “whipped” his bitchy hair (this is how she expresses it because it was the hardest part which required lots of strokes) and the unbelievable leather jacket. It’s amazing how you can actual come out with the texture of materials by just sketching. The glassy look of how eyes should be is also sketched out realistically. Simply amazing. Two thumbs up, Li San. Anyway, please check out her whole collection here at DevianArt. She’s happy if you have any comments ! Li San, can’t wait till you finish your next masterpiece, dear.

Zock On !

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Zock On !

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Am in the mood for some funky music. Teriyaki Boyz in da house, people ! Enjoy Zock On! feat. Pharrell William & Busta Rhymes. A cool promotion video directed by Nigo. This is definitely one good piece of work. Get it goin’ people ! Simple love the part, “Yabame na baby, zock on! zock on!” Here are the lyrics below (not including Busta Rhymes’s rapping tho’). By the way, the pretty lady in the clip is a popular model here in Japan and her name is Jessica Michibata (mixture of Spanish, Italian and Japanese).

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***
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VERBAL
You want that?
She want that?
They want that?
Who want that?
Come get a little bit of this and a little bit of that
if you want a bit of this なら AH AH
言いたくて、言えなくて 良い作戦 見つかんなくて
Come get a little bit of this and a little bit of that
if you want a bit of this なら AH AH
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RYO-Z!
WISE!
LEADER!
VERBAL!
NIGO!
BAPE SOUNDS!
Yo Pharrell!
Busta bust!
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RYO-Z
ヤバメなbaby ヤバメなブレイクビーツ
今夜が山なら ラバダバ エントリー
テクニック 必要とあらばテクニクス
喰い気味に cut クイックリリース
あの娘は面食い おねだり SEXY
男の出る杭 グっと来る Come on!
ボッコボッコに 打ちのめされても
I want you baby ZOCK ON!
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ILMARI
どうしてみても 無理そうなタイミング
どう転んでも 彼女は遮る
どうにもダメだから 引いてみた
でも引いたら それが 最後だった
脳天ビリビリ Just say give me give me
このテンションを保ってる ギリギリ
煩悩の数だけ 僕 浮かれ気味
チャンチャラチャンチャン、ZOCK ON!
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PHARELL
YABAMENA BABY!
GIGANTO!(ZOCK ON)
KAWAII BABY!
GIGANTO!(ZOCK ON!)
MO-DAIMONDAI!
GIGANTO!(ZOCK ON!)
YABAMENA BABY!
GIGANTO!(ZOCK ON!)
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ILMARI
ダンスフロア直行 みんな ルーズコントロール
だから Let’s Rock-on!Gimme some more Gimme some more
ダンスフロア直行 みんな ルーズコントロール
だから Let’s Rock-on!Gimme some more Baby come on
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WISE
What’s happenin’ honey? You know your driving me crazy!
Baselineに またがり Booty shakin’!
いつ見ても変幻自在 これは事件だ 緊急事態
Thick ass thighs, I’m diggin your style
今夜こそ まじ触れてみたい (お願い!)
Big fat smile に 騙された天使
今宵も ふくらむ期待 (ア~イ!)
放し飼いの犬みたいにどこでも
ベロ出して すぐに ぺ~ロぺ~ロ
勘違いする KY
うざがり カード切り捨てる Like a セロ(ファイト!)
パンクラスからプライドまで
異種格闘技みたく 喰らいついて
離れないよ Your body like dynamite,
I ain’t letting you go tonight!
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PHARELL
YABAMENA BABY!
GIGANTO!(ZOCK ON)
KAWAII BABY!
GIGANTO!(ZOCK ON!)
MO-DAIMONDAI!
GIGANTO!(ZOCK ON!)
YABAMENA BABY!
GIGANTO!(ZOCK ON!)
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VERBAL
You want that? She want that?
They want that? Who want that?
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